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Hours Spent Watching TV May Shorten Life Expectancy (Medpage Today)

This detailed writeup of a study on sedentary behavior found that participants who reported watching 3 or more hours of television per day had a twofold risk of death over the 8 year study. Full article here: Hours Spent Watching TV May Shorten Life Expectancy

Sedentary behavior increases the risk of certain cancers (Medical Xpress)

A study by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI) discusses the relationship between TV viewing time, recreational sitting time, occupational sitting time, and total sitting time with the risk of various cancers. The study was a meta-analysis of dozens of sedentary behavior research studies. When the highest levels of sedentary behavior were compared to the lowest, a statistically significant higher risk was found for three particular types of cancer: lung, colon and endometrial. The researchers noted that sedentary […]

Five Health Benefits of Standing Desks (Smithsonian Magazine)

This excellent writeup goes into detail on the benefits of an active lifestyle as it relates to the dangers of being sedentary, citing research from the Mayo Clinic, among others. Great detail is shed on how/why being non-sedentary reduces the risk of several key areas: obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and long-term mortality risk. Full article: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/five-health-benefits-standing-desks-180950259/?no-ist

Morning workout vs breaks from sitting – which is better for blood sugar? (PLOS)

This is study that directly compares the benefits of 30 minutes of morning exercise to the benefits of regular activity breaks in an otherwise sedentary lifestyle. The findings were consistent to other comparable studies, showing that the effects of regular activity breaks are more beneficial to blood glucose and insulin levels than 30 minutes of exercise done all at once. Translation: working out is good for you, but if you sit the rest of the day, you would literally see […]

That Thing You Do All Day May Cut Your Life Short (Yahoo! Health)

Yahoo! Health outlines a study of 93,000 women that shows that sitting for extended periods of time contributes to risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and cancer. The study’s bleak findings show that even small activity breaks each hour help not only stave off the effects of sitting, but also help people feel more focused and stimulated by their tasks at hand. http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/thing-day-may-cut-life-short-194100937.html

Don’t just sit there. Really. (Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles Times article discusses the detrimental aspects of spending the majority of our waking hours sitting, going on to explain that humans simply are not designed to sit for prolonged periods of time. http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/25/health/la-he-dont-sit-20130525

Sitting, Lack of Exercise Linked With Symptoms Of Depression In New Study (Huffington Post)

Huffington Post reports on a study that finds a connection between time spent sitting and mental health. Highlights of the article show that the longer a person sits the more apt they become to have symptoms of depression and anxiety. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/06/sitting-depression-mental-health-exercise_n_3880963.html

How much better is standing up than sitting? (BBC News Magazine)

BBC News chronicles the effects of the average person’s day (sitting 8-12 hours) and how even little breaks throughout the day can have huge impacts on long-term health. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24532996

Employers May Pay Workers for Good Health (HispanicBusiness.com)

HispanicBusiness.com reports on a growing trend of companies who are creating financial incentives for employees that show improvements to their biometric screening results. Similar to car insurance, the systems distribute awards based upon overall fitness levels. http://www.hispanicbusiness.com/2013/8/26/employers_may_pay_workers_for_good.htm

Could simple things like stretching, smiling, and sitting up actually make you work better? (Fast Company)

Fast Company provides this informative article on the roles that both posture and relaxation techniques like stretching, meditation and others, (all parts of the UtiliFIT experience) play in improving workplace performance. http://www.fastcompany.com/3016874/could-simple-things-like-stretching-smiling-and-sitting-up-actually-make-you-work-better